Cleaning, Disinfecting, and the Flu

Cleaning, Disinfecting, and the Flu

Greetings,

“It’s a robust flu season,” said Marcus Plescia, chief medical officer of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

Most states are still seeing moderate to high flu activity and reports of flu-like illnesses, despite earlier hopes the epidemic had peaked. The flu is always dangerous, causing an estimated 9 million to 35 million illnesses, 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 to 56,000 deaths in the United States in a typical year, CDC says.

Most studies have shown that the flu virus can live on surfaces and infect a person for up to 48 hours. Nonetheless, flu viruses are relatively fragile. Standard cleaning and disinfecting are sufficient to remove or kill them. Other measures include getting vaccinated, staying home when sick, covering coughs and sneezes, and hand washing.

According to the CDC, cleaning and disinfecting are part of a broad approach to preventing infectious diseases including the spread of flu.

 

Know the difference between cleaning, disinfecting, and sanitizing

  • Cleaning removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces or objects
  • Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces or objects
  • Sanitizing lowers the number of germs on surfaces or objects

Know the difference between cleaning, disinfecting, and sanitizing

  • Cleaning removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces or objects
  • Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces or objects
  • Sanitizing lowers the number of germs on surfaces or objects

The CDC suggests that cleaning and disinfection must be done correctly. Follow the label directions on cleaning products and disinfectants. Case Medical, a Safer Choice Partner of the Year, offers single use wipes for cleaning and sanitizing surfaces for infection prevention.

Warm Regards,

Marcia Frieze, CEO, and the Case Medical Team

Case Medical | 19 Empire BLVD., South Hackensack, NJ
201-313-1999 | www.casemed.com | info@casemed.com